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The Koreans
By Keirador at 2005-06-25 00:00
An ancient Korean proverb describes Korea as a "shrimp among whales", referring to the three great powers of China, Japan, and Russia that surround the small peninsula. Despite its small status, Korea has historically been able to use cunning diplomacy and shrewd defensive wars to retain its independence. A player who chooses Korea will have to show similar slyness in order to prosper.


Sinking Chances of Seafaring and Non-Seafaring Civilizations
By Ginger_Ale at 2005-06-25 00:00

I have conducted a study on the chances for ships (my test used curraghs) to sink in water (my test used only ocean, though I am pretty sure the chances are the same for sea). I used 50 curraghs (unless otherwise noted) for a non-Seafaring civilization (Rome) and 50 curraghs (unless otherwise noted) for a Seafaring civilization (England). Below is the raw data and a couple of graphs. If you have any questions, feel free to post in this thread. My conclusion is at the bottom of the thread.

All tests done with Conquests, v1.22.

Notes: % that survived a second turn in water is a % of the ones that survived the first turn. For example, if I lose 10 of my 50 curraghs, I have 40. 80% survived the first turn. If I lose 10 more curraghs the second turn, I lost 10 of my remaining 40, so that's 75%.

Data

Plain Survivability


The Japanese
By Keirador at 2005-06-25 00:00
The people who settled the Japanese islands built a rich and proud culture. When knights were sallying forth from castles in Medieval Europe, the Japanese were experiencing their own feudal age, but it could hardly be called a Dark Age. Arts, literature, and national pride flourished during this period. A centuries-long policy of proud isolationism only came to an end when Portuguese sailors landed on the islands, showing the Japanese how far they lagged behind the Western powers. Japan immediately abandoned isolationism and seized upon Western technologies and empire building. This culminated in the creation of the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere, the Japanese empire during World War II. After a crushing defeat, Japan abandoned militarism and founded a new empire based on economics. Today, despite having only nominal military forces, Japan is one of the most powerful nations in the world, and an industry leader in all forms of technology.


The English
By Zardnaar at 2005-06-25 00:00
It was said the sun never set on the English empire. How could an such a small island kingdom rule most of the world? From Maori tribes to the Zulu and the American War of Independence no other country has influenced the modern world as much as England. Its imperial legacy lingers in many countries in the form of their language, law, and political system. While a detailed history lesson is beyond the scope of this review my theory is the English had a secret weapon- the English channel. Also the industrial revolution began in England. War canoes are no match for Frigates and Ironclads.


City Placement
By Ginger_Ale at 2005-04-17 00:00

Disclaimer: This was created for Conquests.

City placement is one of the most important aspects of the game, as well as one of the parts of the game that isn't the same for every game. While military is usually the same for most people, like building up a stack of swordsmen, or waiting for cavalry to take over the world, you have to be able to adapt to the terrain for city placement. It varies from difficulty level, map size, and victory condition!

Hopefully this guide will help you use your cities to your advantage. Enjoy.

I. Placement Patterns

Before we can even discuss the pros and cons of each regular placement pattern, lets go over the following terms.

C = city, x = tile in between cities


Ailing Civilization Strategy
By Drakan at 2005-04-06 00:00
The Ailing Civilization Strategy

It's a strategy devised to catch-up techwise, obtaining numerous techs in a short span of time through trading.

When I'm lagging behind in the tech race at, say, Emperor level or above, I look at the Power Chart and trace a feable civilization with high culture (which probably means it will be ahead of me by several techs). This has been a civ that has typically prioritised research in the earlier game rather than building military units and is currently being overun in an ongoing war by some powerful neighbouring civs.

Requirements
for the ACS:

I. The ailing civ must be at war with TWO or MORE civilizations.
II. It must have FIVE or less cities left to be annihilated.
III. Your reputation must be flawless enabling you to trade techs for gpt.


Catch the Runaway AI
By zerksees at 2005-02-11 01:00
To read and discuss zerksees' article on catching runaway AI civilizations, complete with game example and screenshots, please visit this thread on the forums.



The Indians
By Ision at 2004-09-28 00:00
Known for their rich religious and cultural achievements, India to this very day lives up to its centuries old fame. Perhaps no other modern day nation is so intimately associated with the personality of a single man, in C3C it is the image of that man that stands as its leader-head. It is that image of peacefulness and deep religious heritage, which the game attempts to capture - and to a great degree, it succeeds.


The Sumerians
By Zardnaar at 2004-09-28 00:00
Between the Tigris and the Euphrates arose the Sumerians. In this ancient land they were the 1st among many to use the Tigris and the Euphrates for agricultural purposes and invented the worlds 1st alphabet.


Your AI Opponent
By Ision at 2004-09-28 00:00
What follows is my attempt to help players in choosing and understanding their AI opponents. In CIV III, THE single most important factor for any AIs overall performance is the value of their start location and the immediate vicinity. That said, given a sufficient number of games there are certain trends that begin to bear themselves out. All things being about equal (start location, river access, resource availability, ect) the AIs will perform differently. There are 2 primary reasons for this; their traits and their Unique Unit – the former being far more important on average. Unlike the human player, AI play is wholly scripted and therefore incapable of making the proper adjustments to changing situations. As such, certain traits lend themselves better to the scripted play of the AI than others, and thus produce the ‘on average’ better performance of some AI civs over others.

Free Tech Tricks
By DaveMcW at 2004-09-28 00:00
It's great to get a tech for free, but why settle for just one average tech? Here are some tricks to get more out of your free techs.

Note that most of these tricks work best on lower difficulty levels, where the AI won't beat you to any of the key techs. Also, none of them work in PTW.


Republic Slingshot (C3C)

This is a simple trick to do in Conquests. Just research in order: Alphabet, Writing, Code of Laws, Philosopy, Republic. If you manage to get Philosophy first, you get Republic as your free tech! Becoming a Republic before 1000BC gives you a huge boost in research and growth for the rest of the game.

Don't trade Alphabet or Writing, to keep the AI away from Philosophy as long as possible.


Expansionist Philosophy Slingshot (C3C)


Fort Cities
By Jon Shafer at 2004-09-28 00:00
There are five types (maybe more ) of Forts (temporary cities) that can be implemented in Civ 3, each with a different purpose: Offensive Forts, Chokepoint Forts, Culture Bomb Forts, Stealing Forts and ZoC Forts. Each has a different purpose and can be very useful against opponents, especially of the human sort.

Chokepoint Forts

These kinds of forts are some of the more obvious ones. They exist in order to prevent access between two points of a continent and can only be crossed when attacked. They are perfect locations for cities, as they are highly defensible and MUST be attacked in order to be passed.

Zone of Control Forts


A Study of Espionage Missions
By Oystein at 2004-09-28 00:00
Prices:
Parameters:
dist - distance from actual city or capital to your nearest city
pop - size of actual city or capital
level - level of settlement, 1 for town, 2 for city and 3 for metropol
opp_cult - opponents culture
your_cult - your culture
techs - number of opponents techs
units - total number of opponents units
shield - number of shields the opponent have invested

Factors found in editor:
base - base cost
mapsize - average of width and height
techrate - factor based on world size

[code]
Mission Base Cost formula

Build an Embassy 20 dist*level + base + pop
Investigate City 10 dist*level + base * pop
Steal Technology 10 dist*level + base * techs*techrate/100
Steal World Map 1 dist*level + base * mapsize
Plant Spy 60 dist*level + base
Steal Plans 10 dist*level + base * unit

Rating the Unique Units
By Ision at 2004-09-28 00:00
I often get PMs asking me how I rate a particular UU. It is hard enough to rate the CIV themselves considering the numerous variables involved, while trying to keep a balanced view between the 3 play styles (warmonger, balance of power, peaceful builder). Rating a UU in a vacuum, without any context to the specific map, difficulty level, player skill level, terrain or victory type sought - is perhaps an impossibility. The best one can do is to create a standard that is based on a host of assumptions. In an effort to be fair one must attempt to remove themselves from their own biases that have been formed as a consequence of their personal play preferences and most importantly from the difficulty level that they typically play within. This last bias can often blind a player completely.

Worker Moves
By KayEss at 2004-09-28 00:00
To view KayEss' article on worker moves and how to maximize efficiency, please see the attached PDF file.



The Aztecs
By Ision at 2004-09-28 00:00
Thousands of miles from where the Egyptian Pyramids were built, other Pyramids had been built as well. A Civilization that in many ways matched that of the Western World existed and did not come into contact with the West until the 16th century. That contact brought to an end what was once a mighty empire that stretched thousands of miles, practiced brutal human sacrifices and yet charted the stars, a civilization that boasted the largest city on earth - the 'Venice of the new World'. The mighty Aztecs are the subject of this civ review.


The Hittites
By Ision at 2004-09-28 00:00
It is said that the noise was deafening, the blaring trumpets - the pounding hoofs of horses pulling the largest chariots known - the dying screams of the vanquished - these were the last sounds heard by the once great empire of Babylon. Their demise was at the hands of a new and vibrant warrior culture known as the Hittites. The inventors of iron and perennial foes of Egypt, the Hittites make their appearance in C3C.


Finally Winning on Deity
By Stutz at 2004-09-28 00:00
I can never feel like I've beaten a game unless I take down the AI on the hardest setting. I worked my way up from chieftain to now winning the majority of the time on monarch and emperor; but the deity level victory eluded me until more recently. After quite a few tries with my favorite civs: the Iroquois, Japanese, and Zulu, I started winning with a more disciplined strategy with the Egyptians (this is in plain vanilla Civ 3). The defeats taught me more than the first victory; but I figured I'd write down these tips for you Civ 3 players out there looking for a deity win. The two main problems about winning on the highest difficulty level is getting quick city expansion early and then trying to overcome falling behind all other civs in the tech race. It really puts you on a very defensive and diplomatic stance. The AI gets enormous advantages and works cumulatively against you, even when it fights amongst itself.

A Guide to Great Wonders and How to Use Them
By TheDarkPhantom at 2004-09-28 00:00
This article is primarily inspired by Ision’s 4 Rules of Wonder Addiction Article, an excellent general guide to newbies on how to escape wonder addiction as a major hindrance to improving your Civ3 gaming ability. Seeing that, as far as I’m aware, no one has actually posted a thread like this, and that, perhaps worryingly, I have the time to write it, I thought a general reference guide to the function, value and strategies of all the great wonders could be useful for the Strategy Articles Forum or War Academy to have, as an expansion on the basic wonders information link on the Civfanatics main pages. I welcome anyone’s comments to the strategies I put forward in this thread (and any typo corrections) and will also update the entries to include other’s views if they make good sense to me and are phrased clearly enough.

Death from Above: C3C Airborne Operations
By scoutsout at 2004-09-28 00:00
Foreword

The following Advanced Flight tactics are offered as a supplement to the tactics already in one’s personal "playbook". The author does NOT intend to debate the unit’s overall value, hold these tactics out as "best", or substitute paratroopers for other tactics and units. The author concedes that these tactics may not be the best alternative for a given situation.

Having said that, many players enjoy experimenting with various units, including specialty units like the ‘Paratrooper’. This article is directed to that audience, and to anyone who enjoys analyzing tactical problems and possibilities. While this is an open forum, I would sincerely appreciate it if discussion could be limited to these tactics.

On Tactics and Strategy


 
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