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The Koreans
By Keirador at 2005-06-25 00:00
An ancient Korean proverb describes Korea as a "shrimp among whales", referring to the three great powers of China, Japan, and Russia that surround the small peninsula. Despite its small status, Korea has historically been able to use cunning diplomacy and shrewd defensive wars to retain its independence. A player who chooses Korea will have to show similar slyness in order to prosper.

Sinking Chances of Seafaring and Non-Seafaring Civilizations
By Ginger_Ale at 2005-06-25 00:00

I have conducted a study on the chances for ships (my test used curraghs) to sink in water (my test used only ocean, though I am pretty sure the chances are the same for sea). I used 50 curraghs (unless otherwise noted) for a non-Seafaring civilization (Rome) and 50 curraghs (unless otherwise noted) for a Seafaring civilization (England). Below is the raw data and a couple of graphs. If you have any questions, feel free to post in this thread. My conclusion is at the bottom of the thread.

All tests done with Conquests, v1.22.

Notes: % that survived a second turn in water is a % of the ones that survived the first turn. For example, if I lose 10 of my 50 curraghs, I have 40. 80% survived the first turn. If I lose 10 more curraghs the second turn, I lost 10 of my remaining 40, so that's 75%.


Plain Survivability

The Japanese
By Keirador at 2005-06-25 00:00
The people who settled the Japanese islands built a rich and proud culture. When knights were sallying forth from castles in Medieval Europe, the Japanese were experiencing their own feudal age, but it could hardly be called a Dark Age. Arts, literature, and national pride flourished during this period. A centuries-long policy of proud isolationism only came to an end when Portuguese sailors landed on the islands, showing the Japanese how far they lagged behind the Western powers. Japan immediately abandoned isolationism and seized upon Western technologies and empire building. This culminated in the creation of the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere, the Japanese empire during World War II. After a crushing defeat, Japan abandoned militarism and founded a new empire based on economics. Today, despite having only nominal military forces, Japan is one of the most powerful nations in the world, and an industry leader in all forms of technology.

The English
By Zardnaar at 2005-06-25 00:00
It was said the sun never set on the English empire. How could an such a small island kingdom rule most of the world? From Maori tribes to the Zulu and the American War of Independence no other country has influenced the modern world as much as England. Its imperial legacy lingers in many countries in the form of their language, law, and political system. While a detailed history lesson is beyond the scope of this review my theory is the English had a secret weapon- the English channel. Also the industrial revolution began in England. War canoes are no match for Frigates and Ironclads.

Managing the World: The Machiavellian Doctrine
By dexters at 2005-06-25 00:00

Chapter I: Introduction

This is a style of play that I think some historically and politically minded players may find more rewarding than purely playing for points or winning the game as early as possible. The strategy should be applicable to all difficulty levels.

The Man

Niccolo Machiavelli was born in Florence, Italy at a time when the country was in political upheaval. He became an important diplomat and an ardent supporter of the Florentine republic at during a brief interruption in the rule of the Medici’s in Florence.

When the Medici’s regained their power however, Machiavelli was removed from his post. Eager to ingratiate himself with the new princes who ruled Florence, he broke from his strong support of republicanism and wrote “The Prince”, a work that describes in plain pragmatism how a prince should acquire and maintain power.

The Portuguese
By Keirador at 2005-06-25 00:00
A small but influential nation on the Atlantic coast of the Iberian peninsula, Portugal emerged as a nation independent of Spain in the 12th century AD. Portugal led the drive for colonization and discovery in Europe, and the sprawling nation of Brazil is a legacy of Portuguese ambition. Though during the height of Spanish power Portugal came once again under Spanish dominion, Portugal regained its independence late in the 17th century. Today, Portugal continues to be a prosperous nation, active in the European economy and world affairs.

Cost of the Palace for C3C
By Theoden at 2005-06-25 00:00
One of the things that I’ve always wondered is how the game determines what the palace will cost. So I decided to make some tests to get it cleared out. After extensive testing I came up with the following results. The test was made with C3C 1.22:

* The number of cities in your empire determines the cost of the palace
* The Optimal City Number also has an effect
* The palace can never cost less than 300 shields and never more than 1000 shields

During the tests I also found a lot of things that I concluded to have no effect on the palace cost. All of these are verified to have no effect. If you have any ideas not listed here that could have an effect please point it out:

* Difficulty level
* The size of the map
* The distance to the capital from the different cities
* The sizes of the cities in your empire
* The government you are currently in
* The amount of time that has passed or the current technological level

The French
By Keirador at 2005-06-25 00:00
Though many associate France with ancient Gaul due to geography, the modern nation of France has its roots in the early middle ages, when the Germanic tribe called Franks moved across the Rhine. The French, as the people came to be called, settled, converted to Christianity, and eventually flowered into a nation with a decorated military tradition, a rich culture, a vibrant economy, and a profound impact on history.

France is easily one of the most underestimated civilizations in the game. This is due partly to the abysmally poor AI handling of the nation, and partly to the strange aversion many Americans and Englishmen have toward the French. But don't shortchange France just because of this, or because its pink. With a trait combination of Industrious and Commercial, France has the potential to be the greatest productive powerhouse of the game. Rarely does one see traits so perfectly geared toward a booming economy and highly competitive industry base.

The Dutch
By Zardnaar at 2005-06-25 00:00
With the release of Conquests to the veteran Civ 3 player the Dutch offer a unique trait combo- agricultural and seafaring. Although hardly alone in this regard both of these traits were new when conquests was released. Over the last year or so the agricultural trait has become to be widely regarded as one of the most powerful traits in the game. It gives you an extra food resource in your cities' center tile if your city is beside a river or once you change to a non despotic form of government. In addition it gives you half priced aqueducts, hydro plants and solar plants. You can also irrigate desert tiles and they will produce 2 food and 1 shield for your cities. And finally you get to start with pottery for the all important granary to help with settler factories. Although you can usually trade for pottery sometimes the AI civs closest to you don't have it. Its all about speed- expand fast and you will have an easier game.

City Placement
By Ginger_Ale at 2005-04-17 00:00

Disclaimer: This was created for Conquests.

City placement is one of the most important aspects of the game, as well as one of the parts of the game that isn't the same for every game. While military is usually the same for most people, like building up a stack of swordsmen, or waiting for cavalry to take over the world, you have to be able to adapt to the terrain for city placement. It varies from difficulty level, map size, and victory condition!

Hopefully this guide will help you use your cities to your advantage. Enjoy.

I. Placement Patterns

Before we can even discuss the pros and cons of each regular placement pattern, lets go over the following terms.

C = city, x = tile in between cities

Ailing Civilization Strategy
By Drakan at 2005-04-06 00:00
The Ailing Civilization Strategy

It's a strategy devised to catch-up techwise, obtaining numerous techs in a short span of time through trading.

When I'm lagging behind in the tech race at, say, Emperor level or above, I look at the Power Chart and trace a feable civilization with high culture (which probably means it will be ahead of me by several techs). This has been a civ that has typically prioritised research in the earlier game rather than building military units and is currently being overun in an ongoing war by some powerful neighbouring civs.

for the ACS:

I. The ailing civ must be at war with TWO or MORE civilizations.
II. It must have FIVE or less cities left to be annihilated.
III. Your reputation must be flawless enabling you to trade techs for gpt.

Catch the Runaway AI
By zerksees at 2005-02-11 01:00
To read and discuss zerksees' article on catching runaway AI civilizations, complete with game example and screenshots, please visit this thread on the forums.

The Hittites
By Ision at 2004-09-28 00:00
It is said that the noise was deafening, the blaring trumpets - the pounding hoofs of horses pulling the largest chariots known - the dying screams of the vanquished - these were the last sounds heard by the once great empire of Babylon. Their demise was at the hands of a new and vibrant warrior culture known as the Hittites. The inventors of iron and perennial foes of Egypt, the Hittites make their appearance in C3C.

Finally Winning on Deity
By Stutz at 2004-09-28 00:00
I can never feel like I've beaten a game unless I take down the AI on the hardest setting. I worked my way up from chieftain to now winning the majority of the time on monarch and emperor; but the deity level victory eluded me until more recently. After quite a few tries with my favorite civs: the Iroquois, Japanese, and Zulu, I started winning with a more disciplined strategy with the Egyptians (this is in plain vanilla Civ 3). The defeats taught me more than the first victory; but I figured I'd write down these tips for you Civ 3 players out there looking for a deity win. The two main problems about winning on the highest difficulty level is getting quick city expansion early and then trying to overcome falling behind all other civs in the tech race. It really puts you on a very defensive and diplomatic stance. The AI gets enormous advantages and works cumulatively against you, even when it fights amongst itself.

A Guide to Great Wonders and How to Use Them
By TheDarkPhantom at 2004-09-28 00:00
This article is primarily inspired by Ision’s 4 Rules of Wonder Addiction Article, an excellent general guide to newbies on how to escape wonder addiction as a major hindrance to improving your Civ3 gaming ability. Seeing that, as far as I’m aware, no one has actually posted a thread like this, and that, perhaps worryingly, I have the time to write it, I thought a general reference guide to the function, value and strategies of all the great wonders could be useful for the Strategy Articles Forum or War Academy to have, as an expansion on the basic wonders information link on the Civfanatics main pages. I welcome anyone’s comments to the strategies I put forward in this thread (and any typo corrections) and will also update the entries to include other’s views if they make good sense to me and are phrased clearly enough.


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