Section F: The Future

Civ1 FAQ: The Future

1) Will there be a Civ II?

MicroProse has no plans at the moment to produce a sequel to Civilization. However with so much interest on the Net and If people push and hassle them enough, who knows..?

Note: After a recent communication with MicroProse I was informed that they will be converting Civ to work under Windows. This will include high resolution graphics and "probably" a few enhancements and additions! The person I spoke with said it would "probably" be more of a rewrite than a conversion. Maybe they will finally fix the Advisory Bug after all ๐Ÿ˜‰

Further Note: Civ for Windows has now been released, but details are only coming in slowly. It appears to be a complete conversion and not a rewrite as suggested before. There have also been a number of complains about the overall speed of the game, and the fact that you now require 2-4 meg of memory instead if 640K.

2) Civilization-Like Games.

A post from Bryce Harrington that I felt should be included in the FAQ. I expect that it will be added to in future editions.

"I loved Civilization. What other games are out there that are similar to it?"

I have not yet seen a game that I like better than Civilization. There are not many that "clone" it, but there are many that are similar to it in some ways. Here is a list of games and some short comments on them. [If anyone has additions/corrections, PLEASE include them]

Railroad Tycoon:
Operate a railroad. Pre-Civilization Microprose Game.
SimCity:
Great simulation of the development of a city. It is a *Simulation* game – no opponents, no "winning". You must build a city up by zoning land, setting budgets, repairing damage from disasters, fighting crime, pollution, etc. If you love developing your civilization and hate having to compete with other civilizations, you’d enjoy this game.
SimEarth:
Play God with planet Earth.
Populus:
Play God against another civilization. Cause earthquakes, raise land from the sea. Haven’t played it, though.
Empire Deluxe:
Risk:
Many versions of it exist for the computer. Much simpler than Civilization, but worth trying out. The board game version was more popular than the board game version of Civilization. If Civilization gives you a headache, try this.
Castles:
Play the leader of a medieval king building castles and fighting off the Celts. Good with graphics, you actually watch little men with hammers and saws building away. You determine the number of men working on the different sections of the castle. Celts may attack before you finish, so keep some soldiers ready. Has limited but interesting plotlines that you are able to manipulate by making decisions: " What do you do:

  • 1. Apologize and give 100 pounds tribute to Celts
  • 2. Promise to make amends, but do nothing.
  • 3. Send Celtic messenger’s head back on a platter."

If you like watching your civilization grow, but prefer combat and diplomacy, you’d like Castles.

Spaceward Ho!:
I hear it is like Civilization in space. Control production of planets in you federation.

The following is from Eric R: —–

                  Basically, start on a planet ideal for you.  Build ships 
                  to explore+colonize nearby worlds.  Terraform to make the 
                  planets habitable + mine to get metal to build more 
                  ships.  Research six different areas of technology to get 
                  faster, longer range, more powerful ships which take less 
                  metal to build.  A variety of human and computer 
                  opponents are trying to do the same thing.  (Although 
                  their idea of an ideal planet is different from yours.)

                  Size and shape of galaxy are customizable.  Computer 
                  opponents get advantages to make up for AI, although I 
                  find the AI to be pretty good overall.  The Mac version 
                  networks in seconds: don't know how good the PC will be.

                  There's a lot of humor in the game: sending a ship to a 
                  planet causes the computer to say "YAHH!", many other 
                  sound effects are similar.  The ships you design during 
                  the game play often have very funny pictures. (My 
                  favorite looks like a skull+ribcage with a V-8 motor in 
                  the back.)

                  I'm not sure how the Windows version compares rulewise: 
                  the Mac version just underwent a major upgrade to add 
                  alliances, improved shipbuilding finances, better 
                  messaging between players, etc.

                  Overall, I love it.  Be forewarned: getting this game 
                  while still interested in Civ may end in ruined career, 
                  marriage, etc...
Buzz Aldrin’s Race into Space:
Haven’t played it, but looks like you can control the production/distribution of resources into a space program.
Realms of Conquest:
Very similar to Castles, but has cities which you can control production in (build city walls, expand city, improve health, train army, etc). You use your cities to build an army, then direct it to go to an enemy city and besiege it until it surrenders. Your armies can fight the enemies’ armies on battle fields in real time and in 3D overview. If you prefer the combat in Civilization and don’t like spending the time constructing stuff, making trade routes, getting advances, etc, then you might like this game.

That’s really about it. Again if there are any comments, criticisms or bits I have left out, give me an email at:

djh@gamesdom.demon.co.uk

For those who want more information about Civilization, there is a book called:

Sid Meier’s Civilization, or Rome on 640K a Day by JohnnyWilson and Alan Emrich (ISBN 1-55958-191-3, US$18.95).

If your bookstore doesn’t have it, tell them to contact St Martin’s Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10010, (212) 674-5151. This is a highly recommended book.

Thanks for reading and have fun. ๐Ÿ™‚